480 695-1902 jill@jilldrummond.com
Is it too much to ask to be “happy” at work?

Is it too much to ask to be “happy” at work?

“Happiness” the quality or state of being happy good fortune; pleasure; contentment; joy  “To be happy” Also described as “fulfillment,” “life satisfaction” or “feeling good.” A happy life is built with experiences of pleasant mood, meaning and engagement           Recent reports indicate that the mood in many organizations has turned sour. The economic climate and layoffs breed feelings of fear and mistrust.   People are more concerned with “watching their backs” and “not being the next to go” than they are about doing the best job they can. Irritability ad Rudeness among staff is on the rise and studies show that a person is 80% more likely to be rude to a coworker if they have been treated rudely by someone else. Lets face it, happy workers = a happy bottom line. Happy workers are fulfilled; they feel good about their jobs, know their work has meaning and are more engaged and committed. Studies show that productivity, creativity, problem-solving skills and collaboration all increase in a positive work environment. So why don’t more organizations capitalize on this concept and create a win-win impact to their bottom line? It’s similar to wellness programs supported by many organizations. The organization wins because there is less absenteeism and reduced healthcare costs and the employees win because they are helped to lead healthier lives. A similar investment in its people that the organization can make is to support a positive work environment. The company is rewarded with increased communications, trust, productivity and employee engagement and the employees are happier, have better personal relationships, and even statistically live longer. Companies focus on “economical capital” and “human...
Do you have what it takes to create a positive work environment for your staff?

Do you have what it takes to create a positive work environment for your staff?

Negativity saps the energy of your organization and diverts critical attention from work and performance. Studies show that employees have a much higher level of engagement and productivity in a positive work environment. They are more creative, have better problem-solving skills and are more resilient. While there are several character traits that make leaders successful, there are a few specific core traits that help those leaders promote a positive work environment. The key “Positivity promoting” traits are: • Fairness • Kindness • Honesty • Hope • Forgiveness • Modesty • Curiosity • Creativity • Zest • Humor • Bravery If you combine those traits with essential leadership skills such as effective communication and change management, you will be well on your way. Here a few ideas of actions that you can take right away to start building and supporting an environment of positivity. Be visible and available to staff. I know we are all busy, but don’t stay and work behind closed doors or always behind a computer screen for that matter. Walk around, check in with staff. A friendly greeting and sincere conversation on a personal level goes a long way a to make you more available for those times that staff may need to come to you with a problem or question. Express gratitude Giving specific feedback to staff on projects is always important, but you can go further and acknowledge and thank people for the little things they do to make the workplace a little nicer or someone’s job easier. So many times we save up our praise for major accomplishments, but it can be even...

Jill Drummond to present the first GMP TEA Webinar Event – “What Does Positivity Have to Do With GxP?”

In an effort to provide more value and resources for its membership, the GMP Training & Education Association is hosting its first webinar What Does Positivity Have to Do With GxP?  presented by Jill Drummond.  The webinar will discuss how positivity in the work place is not only good the bottom line, but also GxP compliance and employees themselves. GMP TEA...
Are people born seeing the glass half full or half empty?

Are people born seeing the glass half full or half empty?

Do you ever wonder about that grumpy neighbor down the street whether or not he was born that way? The truth is that our level of optimism and positivity is a complex mix of genetics, how we react to our world and our life circumstances. Our DNA determines about 50% of our disposition for positivity, 40% is influenced by how we view and react to things that happen to us and the remaining 10% is what actually happens to us in life. We can’t change our DNA, but we can change how our brain process’s and interprets life. It is called neuroplasty, and it is a way we can train our brain to overcome negative thoughts. We can dial-up our positivity meter by adopting new thought patterns, behaviors and actions. By expressing gratitude, recognizing the positive moments in our life, completing random acts of kindness, and strengthening our connections with people and loved ones, we can start to shift our focus from the negative to the positive. Like any habit, it can take time, but you can practice positive emotional qualities to build your positivity...